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Transmission of Schott red filter glasses OG 590 and RG 630
Contents:


  1. Visible light
  2. Light Absorption and Color Filters
  3. The Physics of Light and Color - Light Filtration | Olympus Life Science
  4. Colour filter

We will investigate three examples. Magenta light can be thought of as consisting of red light and blue light. A yellow pigment is capable of absorbing blue light.


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Thus, blue is subtracted from the light that shines on the paper. This leaves red light. If the paper reflects the red light, then the paper will look red. Yellow light can be thought of as consisting of red light and green light. A red pigment is capable of absorbing cyan light. That is, red paper can absorb both green and blue primary colors of light recall that cyan light is a mixture of green and blue light. So red and green light shine on the paper; and green light is subtracted.

There is no need to subtract blue light since blue light is not shining on the paper. This leaves red light to be reflected. A blue pigment is capable of absorbing yellow light. That is, blue paper can absorb both red and green primary colors of light recall that yellow light is a mixture of red and green light.

So red and green light shine on the paper; and both the red and the green light are subtracted. There is no color left to be reflected to the eye. Subsequently, the paper appears black. The above discussion applies to the appearance of opaque materials. The distinction between opaque and transparent materials was made earlier in this lesson.

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Opaque materials selectively absorb one or more frequencies of light and reflect what is not absorbed. In contrast to opaque materials, transparent materials selectively absorb one or more frequencies of light and transmit what is not absorbed. Like opaque materials, transparent materials are permeated by pigments that contain atoms that are capable of absorbing light with a single frequency or even a range of frequencies. Knowing the color s of the incident light and the color of light absorbed by the pigment or filter, the process of color subtraction can be applied to determine the color appearance of a transparent material.

We will consider three examples in the space below; the examples are visually depicted in the diagrams below. In Example A, white light i.

Visible light

Magenta absorbs its complementary color - green. Thus, green is subtracted from white light. That leaves red and blue light to be transmitted by the filter. For this reason, the filter will appear magenta recall that magenta light is a mixture of red and blue light when illuminated with white light. This process of color subtraction can be represented by the following equation. In Example B, yellow light i. Thus, green is subtracted from yellow light. That leaves red light to be transmitted by the filter.

For this reason, the filter will appear red when illuminated with yellow light. In Example C, cyan light i. Thus, green is subtracted from cyan light. That leaves blue light to be transmitted by the filter. For this reason, the filter will appear blue when illuminated with cyan light. The reasoning modeled in the above three examples can be used in any situation, regardless of the color of the incident light and the color of the filter. As you approach such problems, whether they involve transparent or opaque materials, be sure to think in terms of primary colors of light and to use the logical reasoning steps.

Avoid memorizing and avoid shortcuts. If a filter is capable of absorbing a color of light that is not present in the mixture of incident light, then merely disregard that color. Since that color of light is not incident upon the object, it cannot contribute to the color appearance of the object. A trip to the local newspaper or film developing company will reveal these same principles of color subtraction at work. The three primary colors of paint used by an artist, color printer or film developer are cyan C , magenta M , and yellow Y.

Artists, printers, and film developers do not deal directly with light; rather, they must apply paints or dyes to a white sheet of paper. These paints and dyes must be capable of absorbing the appropriate components of white light in order to produce the desired affect. Most artists start with a white canvas and apply paints.

These paints have to subtract colors so that you might see the desired image. An artist can create any color by using varying amounts of these three primary colors of paint. Each primary color of paint absorbs one primary color of light. The color absorbed by a primary color of paint is the complementary color of that paint. The three colors that are primary to an artist magenta, cyan, and yellow subtract red, green, and blue individually from an otherwise white sheet of paper.

Light Absorption and Color Filters

Magenta paints absorb green light. Cyan paints absorb red light. Yellow paints absorb blue light. Let's suppose that an artist wishes to use the three primary colors of paint in order to produce a picture of the colorful bird shown at the right. The bird will be painted onto white paper and viewed under white light. It is hoped that the bird will have green tail feathers, a blue lower body, a cyan upper body, a red head, a magenta eye patch, a yellow eye and middle feathers, and a black beak.

How can the three primary colors of paint be used to produce such a likeness? And how can we explain the answers in terms of color subtraction? To produce a green tail, paints must be applied to the tail region in order to absorb red and blue light and leave green to be reflected. Thus, the green tail must be painted using yellow paint to absorb the blue and cyan paint to absorb the red. To produce a blue lower body, paints must be applied to the lower body region in order to absorb red and green light, leaving blue light to be reflected.

Thus, the blue lower body must be painted using magenta paint to absorb the green and cyan paint to absorb the red.

Visible light

To produce a red head, paints must be applied to the head region in order to absorb blue and green light, leaving red light to be reflected. Thus, the red head must be painted using magenta paint to absorb the green and yellow paint to absorb the blue. To produce a cyan upper body, paints must be applied to the upper body region in order to absorb red, leaving green and blue light to be reflected.

If green and blue light are reflected from the upper body region, it will appear cyan recall that blue and green light combine to form cyan light. Thus, the cyan upper body must be painted using merely cyan paint to absorb the red.

The Physics of Light and Color - Light Filtration | Olympus Life Science

To produce a magenta eye patch, paints must be applied to the eye patch region in order to absorb green, leaving red and blue light to be reflected. If red and blue light is reflected from the eye patch region, it will appear magenta recall that blue and red light combine to form magenta light. Thus, the magenta eye patch must be painted using merely magenta paint to absorb the green. To produce a yellow eye and middle feathers, paints must be applied to the eye and middle feather regions in order to absorb blue, leaving red and green light to be reflected.

If red and green light is reflected from the eye and middle feather regions, it will appear yellow recall that red and green light combine to form yellow light. Thus, the yellow eye and middle feathers must be painted using merely yellow paint to absorb the blue. This information is summarized in the graphic below. The process of color subtraction is a useful means of predicting the ultimate color appearance of an object if the color of the incident light and the pigments are known.

By using the complementary color scheme, the colors of light that will be absorbed by a given material can be determined. These colors are subtracted from the incident light colors if present and the colors of reflected light or transmitted light can be determined. Then the color appearance of the object can be predicted. Blue jeans appear blue because the jeans are permeated by a chemical dye. Explain the role of the dye. That is, what does the dye do absorb or reflect to the various frequencies of white light?

The dye is intended to absorb all the colors of visible light except for blue. If only blue is reflected, then the jeans are "blue" jeans. Use your physics understanding to explain this phenomenon. A red shirt contains a pigment which absorbs all the colors of visible light except for red. Since red is reflected to our eyes, the shirt looks red. Express your understanding of complementary colors and the rule of color subtraction by completing the following three diagrams.

White light red-green-blue is shown incident on a sheet of paper that is painted with a pigment that absorbs one of the primary colors of light. For each diagram, determine the color of the two reflected rays and determine the color that the paper appears. Thus, R and B are reflected; this makes the paper look magenta. Thus, G and B are reflected; this makes the paper look cyan. In the diagrams below, several sheets of paper are illuminated by different primary colors of light R for red, B for blue, and G for green.

Indicate what primary colors of light will be reflected and the appearance of the sheet of paper. Note the similarity between this problem and the above problem. Begin with RGB light. White paper does not absorb any colors; subtract nothing. RGB is reflected so the paper appears white. Begin with RG light. RG is reflected so the paper appears yellow. Begin with GB light. GB is reflected so the paper appears cyan. Red paper is capable of absorbing cyan light; subtract GB. Only R is reflected so the paper appears red. Red paper is capable of absorbing cyan light; in this case, G is absorbed; B would be absorbed if it were present ; subtract G.

Begin with BG light. Red paper is capable of absorbing cyan light; in this case, both components of cyan - B and G - are absorbed. Subtract BG.

Nothing is reflected so the paper appears black. Yellow paper is capable of absorbing B light; subtract B. RG is reflected so the paper appears Yellow. Yellow paper is capable of absorbing B light, but there is no B present in the incident light. Thus nothing gets absorbed; subtract nothing. Yellow paper absorbs B light; subtract B. G is reflected so the paper appears Green. Different colored light sources shine on different colored sheets of paper. The indicated paper color represents the appearance of the paper when viewed in white light. Fill in the table below to show the color of light that reflects from the paper i.

See Answer. Red light is incident on the paper. Yellow paper contains pigments capable of absorbing blue light when present. In this case, blue light is not incident upon the paper so nothing gets absorbed. The red light reflects off the paper and it is observed to be red. Magenta paper contains pigments capable of absorbing green light when present.

In this case, green light is not incident upon the paper so nothing gets absorbed. Blue light is incident on the paper. Blue paper contains pigments capable of absorbing both red and green light when present.

Colour filter

The table gives some more examples, displaying the colour of light shining on an object, the colour s absorbed by an object, the colour reflected by an object in this light and the colour of an object seen in this light. Objects appear black in white light because they absorb all colours and reflect none. Objects also appear black in any single colour of light if their colour is not the same as the light. For example, a green object appears black in any other light than green or white which contains green because there is no green light shining on it to reflect into your eyes.

Colour White light is a mixture of many different colours, each with a different frequency. Dispersion of white light by a prism into a spectrum. Red only. Green only. White no colours absorbed. Red all colours absorbed except red. Green all colours absorbed except green. Red only red light to reflect. Black no green light to reflect. Green only green light to reflect.